jeweledeyes: Go ADPi! (Alphie reads)
[personal profile] jeweledeyes
Since no one else volunteered to pick the selection last time, if it's okay with everyone I'd like to go now :3 Some of these are books I've read before and am dying to re-read, and some are books I've wanted to read for awhile.

Book synopses and Goodreads links )

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[personal profile] velle
These are the books for March. The theme I went with is the unusual fairytale twists/fractured fairytale theme.

Lies, Knives, and Girls in Red Dresses by Robert Koertge - Free-verse reveals true stories behind well-known fairy tales, some reset in modern times, as a strung-out match girl sells CDs to drug users, Little Red Riding Hood admits that she wanted to know what it is like to be swallowed whole, and Cinderella's stepsisters are duped.

My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me by Kate Bernheimer - The founder of the literary journal "Fairy Tale Review" collects stories inspired by classic fairy tales and written by such authors as Joyce Carol Oates, John Updike, Francine Prose, Kevin Brockmeier, and Shelley Jackson.

Sisters Red by Jackson Pearce - After a Fenris, or werewolf, killed their grandmother and almost killed them, sisters Scarlett and Rosie March devote themselves to hunting and killing the beasts that prey on teenaged girls, learning how to lure them with red cloaks and occasionally using the help of their old friend, Silas, the woodsman's son.

Kissing the Witch by Emma Donoghue - A collection of thirteen interconnected stories that give old fairy tales a new twist.

The Poison Apples by Lily Archer - At an elite Massachusetts boarding school, three fifteen-year-old girls of very different backgrounds discover a common bond and form a club to plot revenge against their evil stepmothers.

Pretty Monsters by Kelly Link - A collection of monster stories from Kelly Link, and features selections entitled "The Faery Handbag," in which an old wo
[identity profile] oogiesean.livejournal.com
and here is the list of books to chose from for next month:

A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray:

A Victorian boarding school story, a Gothic mansion mystery, a gossipy romp about a clique of girlfriends, and a dark other-worldly fantasy--jumble them all together and you have this complicated and unusual first novel.

Sixteen-year-old Gemma has had an unconventional upbringing in India, until the day she foresees her mother's death in a black, swirling vision that turns out to be true. Sent back to England, she is enrolled at Spence, a girls' academy with a mysterious burned-out East Wing. There Gemma is snubbed by powerful Felicity, beautiful Pippa, and even her own dumpy roommate Ann, until she blackmails herself and Ann into the treacherous clique. Gemma is distressed to find that she has been followed from India by Kartik, a beautiful young man who warns her to fight off the visions. Nevertheless, they continue, and one night she is led by a child-spirit to find a diary that reveals the secrets of a mystical Order. The clique soon finds a way to accompany Gemma to the other-world realms of her visions "for a bit of fun" and to taste the power they will never have as Victorian wives, but they discover that the delights of the realms are overwhelmed by a menace they cannot control. Gemma is left with the knowledge that her role as the link between worlds leaves her with a mission to seek out the "others" and rebuild the Order. A Great and Terrible Beauty is an impressive first book in what should prove to be a fascinating trilogy.


Cat Girl's Day Off by Kimberly Pauley:

Natalie Ng’s little sister is a super-genius with a chameleon-like ability to disappear. Her older sister has three Class A Talents, including being a human lie detector. Her mom has laser vision and has one of the highest IQs ever. Her dad’s Talent is so complex even the Bureau of Extra-Sensory Regulation and Management (BERM) hardly knows what to classify him as.

And Nat? She can talk to cats.

The whole talking-to-cats thing is something she tries very hard to hide, except with her best friends Oscar (a celebrity-addicted gossip hound) and Melly (a wannabe actress). When Oscar shows her a viral Internet video featuring a famous blogger being attacked by her own cat, Nat realizes what’s really going on…and it’s not funny.

(okay, yeah, a frou-frou blogger being taken down by a really angry cat named Tiddlywinks, who also happens to be dyed pink? Pretty hilarious.)

Nat and her friends are catapulted right into the middle of a celebrity kidnapping mystery that takes them through Ferris Bueller’s Chicago and on and off movie sets. Can she keep her reputation intact? Can she keep Oscar and Melly focused long enough to save the day? And, most importantly, can she keep from embarrassing herself in front of Ian?

Find out what happens when the kitty litter hits the fan.

Kissing the Witch: Old Tales in New Skins by Emma Donoghue:

Thirteen tales are unspun from the deeply familiar, and woven anew into a collection of fairy tales that wind back through time. Acclaimed Irish author Emma Donoghue reveals heroines young and old in unexpected alliances--sometimes treacherous, sometimes erotic, but always courageous. Told with luminous voices that shimmer with sensuality and truth, these age-old characters shed their antiquated cloaks to travel a seductive new landscape, radiantly transformed. Cinderella forsakes the handsome prince and runs off with the fairy godmother; Beauty discovers the Beast behind the mask is not so very different from the face she sees in the mirror; Snow White is awakened from slumber by the bittersweet fruit of an unnamed desire. Acclaimed writer Emma Donoghue spins new tales out of old in a magical web of thirteen interconnected stories about power and transformation and choosing one's own path in the world. In these fairy tales, women young and old tell their own stories of love and hate, honor and revenge, passion and deception. Using the intricate patterns and oral rhythms of traditional fairy tales, Emma Donoghue wraps age-old characters in a dazzling new skin.

Hex Hall by Rachel Hawkins:

Three years ago, Sophie Mercer discovered that she was a witch. It's gotten her into a few scrapes. Her non-gifted mother has been as supportive as possible, consulting Sophie's estranged father--an elusive European warlock--only when necessary. But when Sophie attracts too much human attention for a prom-night spell gone horribly wrong, it's her dad who decides her punishment: exile to Hex Hall, an isolated reform school for wayward Prodigium, a.k.a. witches, faeries, and shapeshifters.

By the end of her first day among fellow freak-teens, Sophie has quite a scorecard: three powerful enemies who look like supermodels, a futile crush on a gorgeous warlock, a creepy tagalong ghost, and a new roommate who happens to be the most hated person and only vampire student on campus. Worse, Sophie soon learns that a mysterious predator has been attacking students, and her only friend is the number-one suspect.

As a series of blood-curdling mysteries starts to converge, Sophie prepares for the biggest threat of all: an ancient secret society determined to destroy all Prodigium, especially her.
jeweledeyes: Sailor Venus thinks you're a loser (Gwen tough)
[personal profile] jeweledeyes
Posting early because I'm going to be out of state for the first week of October and I wanted to be able to get the book before I go, if possible. XD This month the theme is Science Fiction because I serendipitously read The Forever Star and Adaptation pretty much back to back and now my brain is like, "OMG sci-fi is the greatest thing in the universe, Lisa, why has it been so long since you read sci-fi you need to read more sci-fi right now."

Book synopses and Goodreads links )

[Poll #1867449]
[identity profile] velle.livejournal.com
For the August 2012 theme, I decided to go with books that have the format: "The ----'s Daughter". I've seen a lot of these books and they always sound so interesting.

The Demon Trapper's Daughter by Jane Oliver - In 2018 Atlanta, Georgia, after a demon threatens seventeen-year-old Riley Blackthorne's life and murders her father, a legendary demon trapper to whom she was apprenticed, her father's partner, Beck, steps in to care for her, knowing she hates him.

The Glass Maker's Daughter by V. Briceland - Sixteen-year-old Risa's disappointment over an unprecedented event is devastating, but the evil and destruction that follows the king's death show her that the god and goddess have special need of her talents and those of her new, lower-class friends.

The Light Bearer's Daughter by O. R. Melling - In exchange for the granting of her heart's desire, twelve-year-old Dana agrees to make an arduous journey to Lugnaquillia through the land of Faerie in order to warn King Lugh, second in command to the High King, that an evil destroyer has entered the Mountain Kingdom.

The Storyteller's Daughter by Cameron Dokey - A retelling of the classic tale "The Arabian Nights" in which Shahrazad agrees to marry the king and surrender her life, but uses her story telling skills to keep the king from killing her, until a treacherous plot threatens her plan.

The Tree Shepherd's Daughter by Gillian Summers - Upon the death of her mother, a Los Angeles attorney, sixteen-year-old Keelie is sent to live with her father, a woodworker at Renaissance fairs, and discovers that the odd "allergy" she has to wood is actually powerful earth magic that she must learn to control.

The Musician's Daughter by Susanne Emily Dunlap - In eighteenth-century Vienna, Austria, fifteen-year-old Theresa seeks a way to help her mother and brother financially while investigating the murder of her father, a renowned violinist in Haydn's orchestra at the court of Prince Esterhazy, after his body is found near a gypsy camp.

The Minister's Daughter by Julie Hearn - In 1645 in England, the daughters of the town minister successfully accuse a local healer and her granddaughter of witchcraft to conceal an out-of-wedlock pregnancy, but years later during the 1692 Salem trials their lie has unexpected repercussions.
[identity profile] oogiesean.livejournal.com
The Night Fairy by Laura Amy Schitz:

What would happen to a fairy if she lost her wings and could no longer fly? Flory, a young night fairy no taller than an acorn and still becoming accustomed to her wings — wings as beautiful as those of a luna moth — is about to find out. What she discovers is that the world is very big and very dangerous. But Flory is fierce and willing to do whatever it takes to survive. If that means telling others what to do — like Skuggle, a squirrel ruled by his stomach — so be it. Not every creature, however, is as willing to bend to Flory’s demands. Newbery Medal winner Laura Amy Schlitz and world-renowned illustrator and miniaturist Angela Barrett venture into the realm of the illustrated classic — a classic entirely and exquisitely of their making, and a magnificent adventure.

Cat Girl's Day Off by Kimberly Pauley:

Natalie Ng’s little sister is a super-genius with a chameleon-like ability to disappear. Her older sister has three Class A Talents, including being a human lie detector. Her mom has laser vision and has one of the highest IQs ever. Her dad’s Talent is so complex even the Bureau of Extra-Sensory Regulation and Management (BERM) hardly knows what to classify him as.

And Nat? She can talk to cats.

The whole talking-to-cats thing is something she tries very hard to hide, except with her best friends Oscar (a celebrity-addicted gossip hound) and Melly (a wannabe actress). When Oscar shows her a viral Internet video featuring a famous blogger being attacked by her own cat, Nat realizes what’s really going on…and it’s not funny.

(okay, yeah, a frou-frou blogger being taken down by a really angry cat named Tiddlywinks, who also happens to be dyed pink? Pretty hilarious.)

Nat and her friends are catapulted right into the middle of a celebrity kidnapping mystery that takes them through Ferris Bueller’s Chicago and on and off movie sets. Can she keep her reputation intact? Can she keep Oscar and Melly focused long enough to save the day? And, most importantly, can she keep from embarrassing herself in front of Ian?

Find out what happens when the kitty litter hits the fan.

Ninth Ward by Jewell Parker Rhodes:

Twelve-year-old Lanesha lives in a tight-knit community in New Orleans' Ninth Ward. She doesn't have a fancy house like her uptown family or lots of friends like the other kids on her street. But what she does have is Mama Ya-Ya, her fiercely loving caretaker, wise in the ways of the world and able to predict the future. So when Mama Ya-Ya's visions show a powerful hurricane--Katrina--fast approaching, it's up to Lanesha to call upon the hope and strength Mama Ya-Ya has given her to help them both survive the storm.

Ninth Ward is a deeply emotional story about transformation and a celebration of resilience, friendship, and family--as only love can define it.

Banshee by Hayden Thorne:

When Natty meets Miles Lovell, a sophisticated friend of his cousin, he thinks he's found something worth his while. During their long visit together, Natty discovers things about himself that he had never expected, and manages to acquire a ghostly companion as well.
jeweledeyes: Sailor Venus thinks you're a loser (Richard reads)
[personal profile] jeweledeyes
A few days early but I thought I'd do the poll for next month's book selection now, while I was thinking about it. XD The theme I'm going for this month is Fairytale Retellings, since I still have Toads and Diamonds on the brain.

Book synopses and Goodreads links )

[Poll #1843334]
nikkiscarlet: Adorable cartoon stick figures run around screaming, "OMG" and "ONOZ". (ONOZ)
[personal profile] nikkiscarlet
Not only am I late with this list, but after compiling the list once, a glitch happened and I lost the whole thing and had to rewrite. FUN! I'm sorry this is so late, guys! I never quite registered that it had transitioned between April and May while I wasn't looking. X(

So, since we have less time to work with this month, our theme for May will be light reading. Light reading, in this case, meaning books that are roughly 250 pages or less. (I was actually planning on going even shorter, but it made finding good stories pretty difficult.)

List of books with synopses and Goodreads links )

[Poll #1838700]
[identity profile] lorenta.livejournal.com
This month's theme: Books set in India/the Middle East or with an Indian protagonist
Summaries & Links to Goodreads )

[Poll #1830389]
[identity profile] velle.livejournal.com
These are the books I've selected for March, I've gathered up books that have characters from different cultures/characters from different ethnicites. Please comment on the book you would most like to read for March.

Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt - Focuses on the life of Frank McCourt, an Irish Catholic, and his family.

Becoming Naomi Leon by Pam Munoz Ryan - This book features a young girl named Naomi who runs away to Mexico.

The Devil's Arithmetic by Jane Yolen - This book focuses on a Jewish girl named Hannah and includes World War II and the horrors of the concentration camps.

Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan - This book focuses on a young Mexican girl named Esperanza and her mother. The background is the eve of the Great Depression.

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan - This book focuses on four Chinese women and the stories of their pasts.

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry - This book focuses on a Jewish girl named Annemarie and is set during World War II.

A Thousand Never Evers by Shana Burg - This book focuses on a young girl named Addie and takes place in Mississippi during the Civil Rights Movement. 

Warriors Don't Cry by Melba Beals - This is written by Melba Beals, one of the students chosen to integrate the Little Rock, Arkansas high school in 1957.

Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin - This book focuses on Minli and her quest to find the Old Man of the Moon.
[identity profile] oogiesean.livejournal.com
I'm going to do sort of a holiday theme this month. Two of the books will fall under a sort of Mardi Gras theme since the Krewes use Greek, Roman, and Egyptian gods to form the parade they ride in and two will be love stories for Valentines day. Once we pick a title we all agree on we will read it and post a review about it.

Okay the books we have to chose from this month are:

The Red Pyramid (The Kane Chronicles, Book 1) series, about a biracial (white and black) brother and sister who get entangled with the Gods of ancient Egypt. Action-packed and fun.

The Heroes of Olympus, Book One: The Lost Hero series, by Rick Riordan. Sequel to the bestselling Percy Jackson series, about a summer camp for the children of Greek Gods, but can be read independently. Two of the POV-protagonists are of color: Leo has a Hispanic mother and Piper has a Cherokee father, although both also have a parent who is a Greek God.

Ash, by Malinda Lo. A well-written re-telling of Cinderella in which she falls for the King’s Huntress rather than the prince.

Boy Meets Boy, by David Levithan. A romantic comedy set in a town in which homophobia does not exist, and the homecoming queen used to be a guy named Daryl. I’m counting it as a fantasy on the grounds that it’s set in an alternate universe.

Since I can't do a poll other then posting the book titles just post what book you want to read in the comments and we can go from there.
jeweledeyes: Fry from Futurama holding a book, text says "Reading is FUNdamental" (Fry reading)
[personal profile] jeweledeyes
Okay so per the suggestions here, I'm thinking that since there are 6 of us, we could do it where we each take a turn picking the books to vote on for the month, and then the other 6 months we pick a theme and everyone makes suggestions for the voting list. We can amend this as we go along, but I thought I'd get the ball rolling for this month and we can see where it takes us...?

Also, for discussion: I was thinking that after we pick the book, I'll make a "Book discussion post" and you can either discuss the book in the comments and/or write up a review on your blog or journal and link it. Does that sound good?

Anyway, the theme I am going with is Historical fiction with LGBT characters. I haven't read any of these but just picked some off this list that sounded good, so here's hoping.

Before voting, here are book synopses and links to reviews )

Now for the poll...

[Poll #1809397]

Finally, since we are more than a week into January, should this be for January/February combined? Or should we put the pedal to the metal and move ahead as planned, picking another book next month? (Also, who wants to go next?)